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Tire pressure

Discussion in 'Daihatsu Hi jet' started by daveoneppo, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. daveoneppo

    daveoneppo New Member

    What is the correct air pressure (PSI)..For stock 12 inch Hijet tires....Nothing is printed on the tires on my truck..Thanks
     
  2. Front: 1.8 kgf/cm2 Rear: 2.2 kgf/cm2

    Br,
    Don
     
  3. fupabox

    fupabox Active Member

    27 psi front 30 rear is what my manual calls for if that helps....I'm running 30 and 30 with my new larger tires and seems about right
     
  4. daveoneppo

    daveoneppo New Member

    Thanks for your help...
     
  5. jtpc

    jtpc Member

    Yes, I run between 30-35psi. The tires usually are max inflation of 35 anyways
     
  6. fupabox

    fupabox Active Member

    just reduced pressure to 27 psi front and rear to smooth out the potholes...seems a bit smoother
     
  7. olddatsunfan

    olddatsunfan Member

    I'm running at 28 psi front and rear and it seems to be OK. I'm also running fairly large 22" diameter all season tires, 175/70/13 so the bumps and such aren't very bad considering.
     
  8. RegentYeti

    RegentYeti New Member

    Would that be the same for a Suzuki Carry with 12" G47 tires? Mine are all sitting at around 20psi right now, and I just bought the truck a few days ago.
     
  9. Ironraven

    Ironraven Active Member

    Doesn't it say right on the sidewall? Every single tire I've ever purchased, even ATV tires have the size and proper inflation pressure clearly printed on the sidewall...
     
  10. RegentYeti

    RegentYeti New Member

    Same here, but not on these tires. Unless it's in one of the other sets of numbers and either doesn't have units (psi, kgf/m2) or uses some weird units that I don't know to look for.
     
  11. fupabox

    fupabox Active Member

    tires will never have proper inflation pressure on them..they list maximum pressure and that's all..every different model and make of vehicle has a different weight,carrying capacity,etc...therefore inflation will be different on different vehicles...so the manufacturer put's the recommended psi on each vehicle..
     
  12. kegoangoango

    kegoangoango Member

    Depends on the tire

    When I ran the Carlsie 486 (lightweight ATV tires) I carried 30 front and rear. However, these tires are really too lightweight for the truck (especially the front) and they wore out in about 3 years. The sidewalls just can't take it.

    I then upgraded to GBC 25" Grim Reapers, which have about a 330lb rating (plenty for the truck, gear and two passengers). I run this with 12 in the front and 9 in the rear. They also removed a lot of what I thought was "bottoming out". With the 486s, what was actually happening was the tire was "bottoming out" on the rims. (Yes, the Grim Reapers required new wheels as the 4" standard wheel is too narrow.)
     
  13. greg0187

    greg0187 Moderator Staff Member

    My tire pressure ratings on my daihatsu were on a sticker on the inside of one of the door jambs.
     
  14. wheelio

    wheelio New Member

    I know this is a very old thread but i had been driving my truck for quite a while b4 i checked the tire pressure (they seemed fine). The door sill said 2.4-2.8 bar and when i checked the tires they were 58psi in the front and 54 in the back on the stock 12" LT tires. I set them all down to 40 and they don't look or feel so hard anymore but i will see how they handle now. Has anyone else had a truck delivered with tire pressures that high?
     
  15. Jigs-n-fixtures

    Jigs-n-fixtures Well-Known Member

    There should be a tire pressure rating on the tires themselves. The door sticker is only good with the stock tires it left the factory with.
     
  16. matt167

    matt167 Active Member

    Never just run max pressure on the tire. The door sticker will be for the stock tire size and load range, not just the factory tire. that goes out the window with the mini trucks, because LT's are not available in USA.

    When I had 12" on mine, the Yokohamas were maxed at 32 PSI which was the tires max for the load carrying capacity. They still squatted pretty bad
     
  17. wheelio

    wheelio New Member

    Thanks Matt,
    I looked them over (12" Yokohama's) and I'm surprised the excessive pressure for so long did not damage them or cause a blowout. I should have checked them earlier but I have other tires that are 45# to 65# psi so I didn't really freak until I translated that door sticker. I will put them all down to 32 today and check it out. I only drive on pavement and would like it a little softer but already better than 50#. At least I don't feel every seam in the pavement anymore.
     
  18. Jigs-n-fixtures

    Jigs-n-fixtures Well-Known Member

    The best way to figure out the correct Tire pressure is to use one of the laser pointed infrared spot thermometers. You run the truck, to warm up the tires, and then take a temp reading at the edges and middle of the tire. You should have an even temp at all three points, if the suspension is right and the tire properly inflated. If the temp is higher but even on the outsides, then your under inflated. If the temp is high in the middle, then your over inflated.

    If one side of the other is hotter, you need to check the suspension. If both outsides are hot, then you have too much toe. If it is hot on both of the insides you have too little toe. If one outside is hot you have too much camber, if the inside is hot, you have too little camber.
     
  19. matt167

    matt167 Active Member

    If yours are LT, they are load range E good for 80 PSI.

    Mine on my truck were Yokohama YS372 tires which are replacement tires available in the USA basically for a Geo metro which takes the same size but they are not LT's
     
  20. G1wood

    G1wood New Member

    Is usually printed on a silver decal attached to the rear door post on the driver's side when you open the door. Should list tire pressures for front and rear for all wheel sizes available for the vehicle, same as on north America vehicles.
     

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