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Tachometer Installation

Discussion in 'Suzuki Carry' started by Tom Notch, Feb 21, 2008.

  1. Tom Notch

    Tom Notch New Member

    I purchased a SunPro tachometer for my 2000 Suzuki Carry. The truck has coil over plug ignition and has no distributer. The Tach was designed to work with a Distributer-less Ingition System (DIS) and has dip switches to allow it to work on any engine from 2 to 12 cylinders, so it should have been an easy installation. Problem: Where do you get the trigger signal for the tachometer? I could not find a lead wire behind the dash or on the engine. Has anyone installed a tachometer on a newer generation Suzuki mini who can give me a pointer? Thanks.
     
  2. RICAHRDT

    RICAHRDT Member

    I"m in the same boat as you Tom, but I have a 93" Carry and just purchased a simaliar Tach Mine looks to hook up to the Dist. I was wondering the very same thing about tach's on these trucks. the engine is so quiet it hard to tell what its doing. Good luck with yours. The only problem I've seen eith mine was the wire length that came with the gauge. bout 16" not to thought ful on there part.
     
  3. ibkg

    ibkg Member

    I have a 1993 Mitsubishi U14T and I just installed a iEquus model 8068 tach today and it works on engines from 1 to 10 cyl also it comes with a inductive pickup that you just clamp around any plug wire for your tach signal hope this helps
     
  4. RICAHRDT

    RICAHRDT Member

    WHERE did you install the guage it self? dash board? The one i got is a "Glow Shift"
    its not a bad guage looks easy to install but it didn't come with much just playing with where to put the guage might not have to much choice
    thanks
     
  5. ibkg

    ibkg Member

    I installed mine right on the dash I will post a picture of it later have a good day
     
  6. gbrad

    gbrad Member

    Hey Tom Notch,

    Find the Hall Effect sensor and check to see if you can pick up a signal from there. On my '99 it is located on the rear of the cylinder head possibly being driven off the cam shaft. Another name could be cam position sensor, but the device is an optical or magnetic switch that controls the spark. Also called SPOUT, "spark out" signal. Mine has three wires one will show the firing signals.

    As a test you might push a straight pin through the wires one at a time and with a test light touch the straight pin and see if you get a flashing light or solid light or no light. Obviously the one that flashes is the signal pick up.

    Hope this helps.

    gbrad
     
  7. Tom Notch

    Tom Notch New Member

    Thanks to all of you for the prompt quality information. The cam position sensor sounds like the ticket. You guys are amazing!! Tom
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2008
  8. djmoe

    djmoe New Member

  9. djmoe

    djmoe New Member

  10. micah

    micah New Member

    What is redline on these motors?
     
  11. Rickster

    Rickster Member

    Tom Notch

    I just received my Equus 6068 tach and noticed in the installation instructions the following:

    C. For conventional 4-cycle and Coil on Plug ignition systems, connect the
    GREEN wire to the negative side of the ignition coil (on Coil-On-Plug
    Systems, make the connection to the negative side of one of the coils only).

    Does this help you? What is the best way to find the negative side of the coil-on-plug?
     
  12. carry92

    carry92 Member

    Check the brown and white coil wire. The electrical diagram shows it as the negative coil wire
     
  13. oldsnowman

    oldsnowman Member

    Hi...i just put one of those tach's in my truck a mitsu and it works great:D on the red line question...i don't know:confused: at but at 100k's mine is at 6500rpm:eek:

    wyatt
     

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  14. micah

    micah New Member

    Yeah, I was kinda thinking it is probably in the 7500 to 8000 RPM range for redline.
     
  15. carry92

    carry92 Member

    I think that you would get valve float before 8000 RPM.

    The F6A engine has peak torque at 4000 RPM and peak HP at 6000 RPM.
    Most engines with a 6000 RPM peak HP have a redline around 6500 to 7000 RPM.

    The manual does not list and HP or torque specs?
     
  16. slimbad

    slimbad Member

  17. oldsnowman

    oldsnowman Member

    i don't know about the valve floating thing...these are very high rev engines kind of like a motorcycle:) overhead cams type engines don't have the problems that the push rod V8's do...most push rod engine have a hydro lifter that runs on the cam to the push rods, this is where most of valve float comes from. the other cause is weak valve springs, but if you have weak valve springs, you would have had other problems by now. the lifter, in a high rpm setting, gets pumped up with oil and can't bleed down fast enough and hanges the valves open:( as far as i know these 660 engine are "cam & carrier" and are manually adjusted so just like having solid lifters like they put in drag cars so they can take the high rpm load.:D NOW i am not saying you should take your mini truck down the highway and see how fast it will go, this is just information. the newer trucks with electronic spark have rev limiters so the engine will stop you before you do damage. things to help keep your mini truck running good is to make sure your cam belt is good, and that your timimg is right...one more thing, low octane fuel will cause detonation:eek:
    hope this helps someone :D
    wyatt
     
  18. carry92

    carry92 Member

    The Carry has the most modern engine that I work on. My daily driver is a 1971 MGB and it has a Crane fast street cam, ARP solid lifters and a flowed head. The engine has been bored to .040 over and blue printed/balanced. The head has dual uprated springs. I get valve float at about 7000 RPM.
    Every 4 cycle engine that I have operated will get valve float if over revved.

    The octane thing has been a topic for some time in the MG gear head world.
    Higher octane fuel burns slower and consequently produces more usable power in an engine that is designed for it. There is no value or increase in performance in burning premium in and engine that is designed to run on regular.
    The compression ratio on my MG is 9.8:1 and it runs fine on regular when operated around town with the ignition retarded 3 degrees. When operating on the highway in mountainous areas I advance the ignition back to the factory setting and burn premium.
    Remember that this engine was designed back in the 40s to operate on good old leaded premium. The distributor is the old kind with points and a capacitor.

    The best choice of fuel is the lowest grade that does not produce pinging when the engine is under load while operating in its; middle RPM range.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2008
  19. oldsnowman

    oldsnowman Member

    you are right about the fuel, if you do not have a compression higher then 10:1, using premium gas is a waste of money unless you are pulling a trailer and running your engine hot. higher octain fuel is use to cool the engine in high compression or heavy load situations. you are right in saying that it does not help an engine that only need regular (if the engine is performing good) in fact it will make it worst. the engine will not reach proper engine temp causing poor performance and poor gas mileage. on the other hand if you have an engine that always runs a high temp (and you can find anything wrong) then use permium, it will run cooler. on your valve float you are having, do you loose power when you think your valves are floating? if so, you should stop reving that high, you will do engine damage:( and that would be a crime on a classic. check with the place you got your performance spring from and see if they got something better:D
    wyatt
     
  20. carry92

    carry92 Member

    The highest RPM that I normaly shift at is 5500. The high RPM run was to see when float happened.
     

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