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New '93 Hijet Climber.

Discussion in 'Daihatsu Hi jet' started by Frank_Gallagher, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:32 PM.

  1. Frank_Gallagher

    Frank_Gallagher New Member

    Hi, I just picked up a 93' Hijet Climber. Zippy little thing, runs like a sewing machine!

    I just found some rims and tires from a 82 Mazda RX7 and from what I've read, it's the same bolt pattern.

    Will test bolt on easily or will I need to lift it?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ttc

    ttc Active Member

    The hub bore is to small and will need to be machined out
     
  3. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    I used those on my 1992 S83P, I just used a hole saw to enlarge the center bore to fit, Made a plywood centering jig, bolted to the inside of the wheel to keep the saw centered. Bit of a butcher job, but did the job nicely. Getting bigger wheels and larger tires on made it a pleasure to drive.
     
  4. Frank_Gallagher

    Frank_Gallagher New Member

    How much more do I need to enlay the center diameter?
     
  5. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    Enlarge enough to go over the front hubs. I used a 2 3/4" hole saw. You really only need to do the two front ones, but I did all four, so I can rotate my tires.
     
  6. ttc

    ttc Active Member

    I used a router and wood bit of the appropriate size. There are YouTube videos of people using this method. Works good. It was gonna be a minimum of hour per rim at a machine shop. My brother is a machinist and turned a set of ford rims to put on his civic in the 90s but he lives to far away
     
  7. ttc

    ttc Active Member

    I also ran 165 Walmart winter tires all the time. Cant remember the ratio to keep the diameter from going much larger then stock. As larger tires you will notice the pulling power at higher speeds
     
  8. ttc

    ttc Active Member

    I was never able to find a mud and snow 13 inch tire.
     
  9. Jigs-n-fixtures

    Jigs-n-fixtures Well-Known Member

    Quick tip: Get a hole saw that fits into the existing hole: Gt a six inch length of 1/4-inch rod; and, replace the pilot bit in both bits and join the arbors together so that the smooth part of the smaller bit is sticking out of the larger bit about 3/8-inch past the teeth.

    You now have a good guide for the bit your using to enlarge the hole, utilizing the existing hole as your guide. And, if you can’t get a smaller bit with a close fit, you can wrap the guide bit with the aluminum duct tape to get the diameter larger. Just be sure to wrap the tape so it won’t try to unwrap as the bit turns in the hole.
     
  10. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    I have Hankook I-Pike RC01 175/70/R13 @ $38.00 each at CTC. No noticeable power loss at highway speed ( 80 Km ) and my speedo is "spot on" according to the GPS.
    For off road, I use Carlisle "All Trail" tires mounted on my stock steel wheels - not the greatest setup, but I stick mostly to trails - no hard core bushwacking.
     
  11. Frank_Gallagher

    Frank_Gallagher New Member

    The tires that came on my rims are 195/70-13

    Will these work without lifting the truck?
     
  12. ttc

    ttc Active Member


    Are you saying 80 kilometers per hour is highway speed. Hell I run 80-90 on the back roads and 110 indicated or more on the down grades when on the highway.
     
  13. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    Oh mine will certainly do 110, but is it really safe? On the 4 lane, I can tell when I am being overtaken because I can feel the sudden push of wind speeding me up from behind. And a good gust of wind from the side can suddenly push me over to the next lane, or the road shoulder. So I choose the back roads and 80 Km is my choice to both save the truck and my skin. I have a 1969 Mini with a twin cam, 16 valve engine that will go over 200 KM if I feel like going fast.

    Cheers
     
  14. Jigs-n-fixtures

    Jigs-n-fixtures Well-Known Member

    There are a bunch of online calculators where you can put in the tire call out, and it will give you the recommended rim width, and the outside diameter. Google to find one, and then use it to tell you the diameter and width of the tires.

    Also, I’ve noticed a couple of folks who have yet to fill out their signature field with their truck information. Please go to the blue field near the top of the page, follow the dark blue length and put your truck information in your signature. It makes it a lot easier to give you informed answers to your questions. And, there are a couple of the guys who frequently answer folks questions and give good advice, who are choosing to not respond at all to questions from folks who have not filled out their signature. Might be why, if you look, the only folks besides me in this thread are three newbies.
     
    Limestone likes this.

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