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Catalytic converter temp sensor?

Discussion in 'Daihatsu Hi jet' started by dale hynes, Oct 26, 2017.

  1. dale hynes

    dale hynes Member

    I have a 93 Hijet. The converter was 60% plugged and the temp light was on most of the time. I removed the converter and temp sensor, now the truck surges at speed. Does that temp sensor have any effect of carburetor metering of fuel? I also filled up with 94 octain right after I removed the converter. Also where can I find a diagram of the carb for rebuilding it?
     
  2. Matt123

    Matt123 New Member

    I just got a 1996 hijet that I just got running that is running poorly (surging, won't idle) the exhaust sensor has been broken off so if it all effects the carb I too would love to know. (EF-GS twin cam)
     
  3. fmartin_gila

    fmartin_gila Active Member

    Should be able to find a parts breakdown/diagram at megazip. Just off the top of my head, I would guess that somehow the carb needs the feedback from that temp sensor to run properly. Surging is normally an indication that it is running on the lean side so might be running a bit hotter than it should be too. You might take a look at the EGR valve and make sure it is not carboned up enough so that it doesn't shut off completely and ensure the PCV system is functioning properly as both will throw off carb adjustments. Years ago on the fleet vehicles, my normal procedure was to make a solid block off plate and sandwich it under the EGR valve and its mounting surface to totally eliminate it.

    Fred
     
  4. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    The BBQ light on my 1992 S83P also stays on all the time. The cat is not blocked, and everything seems to run OK, but the light is annoying. I think it is just a bad sensor or a wiring problem. Does anybody have a wiring diagrame that shows the operation ? I am thinking most likely a grounding problem, but where do I look?
     
  5. shogun

    shogun Active Member

    I can tell from my old BMW here in Japan. All Japanese vehicles needed per regulation a cat temp sensor, this was to start the warning light on the cluster when the cat got glowing hot (for example when clogged) and when parked the car could set something on fire when parked on grass for example.
    This additional sensor (not needed in other countries) was/is not connected to the engine control, it just goes to a relay and when the temperature of 870 degree C would exceed, the check control warning light would start.
    Often the wires or connectors are bad, Troubleshooting on cars which are exported from Japan and where such problem arises is often: remove the relay and all is quiet.
     
  6. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    Thanks - sort of what I expected, but where do I start cutting to eliminate it. Or is it best to just remove the bulb.
     
  7. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    According to Derek at G & R Imports, the exhaust temp wires should be cut from the sensor, connected together and then connect them to ground. This will eliminate the light and will not cause any engine running issues. As Shogun states, it is only an exhaust heat warning device, not like an O2 sensor on fuel injected systems. I will be doing this next weekend
     
  8. Jared b

    Jared b New Member

    Is there a thread or video on this process? Sorry not really mechanically inclined
     
  9. shogun

    shogun Active Member

    I can only show you the temp sensors on my 11/1988 BMW E32 750 and the relay for that, should be similar, so just cut - as mentioned above- the 2 sensor wires from the sensor and connect them together directly.
    As bobjonah is doing it next week, he can make pics from his car.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. bobjonah

    bobjonah Member

    I did the modification yesterday, and it works great. The light goes out as soon as the engine starts. I cut the wires from the sensor, connected them together and then grounded them. Cheers to G & R Imports for the tip
     

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